Guest Speakers

Sep 20, 2019, 20:22

Guest Speaker: Our History Is Our Strength

Monday, 28 February 2011 23:48

By Jamie Leeds

guest_march11The president of Women Chefs & Restaurateurs calls on us to acknowledge the achievements of women culinarians and hospitality professionals in recognition of National Women’s History Month.

In 1987, Congress declared March National Women's History Month. A special Presidential Proclamation annually honors the extraordinary achievements of American women. The National Women’s History Project (www.nwhp.org) based in Santa Rosa, Calif., has declared 2011’s theme “Our History Is Our Strength.”

Women Chefs & Restaurateurs (WCR) was founded in 1993 by Lidia Bastianich, Elka Gilmore, Joyce Goldstein, Johanne Killeen, Barbara Lazaroff, Mary Sue Milliken, Anne Rosenzweig and Barbara Tropp. WCR’s mission then and now is to promote and enhance the education, advancement and connection of women in culinary and hospitality fields. We offer a variety of networking, professional and support services—including a vibrant scholarship/internship program that creates opportunities for future and established professionals to gain needed or desired skills at home and abroad.

Guest Speaker: Modeling Ethics through Leadership

Tuesday, 01 February 2011 00:01

By Paul DeVries, M.A.Ed.

guest_feb11Teacher Rafe Esquith of Los Angeles personifies the meaning of a moral and inspirational education leader.

Moral leaders in academia stand few and far between. It is only the pervasive and tenacious who are able to remain steadfast in their mission, to have the courage to speak up despite others’ moods of discouragement. Far too often, freshman teachers capitulate early in their careers, falling victim to an all-too-common faceless bureaucracy. There is, however, a light that shines bright, one that can provide hope to even the most overworked and underappreciated teacher.

Guest Speaker: Understanding the Learning Process

Thursday, 06 January 2011 20:16

By Kirk T. Bachmann, M.Ed., CEC, AAC

guest_jan11In culinary and pâtisserie arts, assessment should be structured so that the emphasis in practical, hands-on skill development is on cooking and baking skills and their respective applications. Here, Chef Bachmann uses the proper teaching of the classical mother sauces and their derivates to illustrate.

Before students fully grasp the specific techniques involved in cooking and baking, it is imperative that they first develop a thorough understanding of fundamental skills or techniques. In developing meaningful learning activities that leverage behavioral learning principles, dynamic educators focus on increasing the frequency of their students correctly achieving their assigned task or tasks. The goal of any robust learning activity is to facilitate an observable change in behavior.

As a long-time educator with Le Cordon Bleu, I take great pride in developing learning activities for adult learners enrolled in our various culinary-arts and pâtisserie and baking programs. A percentage of our students are cooking enthusiasts, many are career changers, but most are recent high-school graduates. Adult learners are unique. They are interested in academic application that is interdisciplinary in nature and incorporates previously learned proficiencies. “Adults are autonomous and self-directed. They need to be free to direct themselves. Their teachers must actively involve student participation in the learning process and serve as facilitators for them” (Lieb, 1991).

Guest Speaker: My Culinary Awakening in Europe, Part 2

Wednesday, 01 December 2010 00:45

By Michael Riggs, Ph.D, CEC, FMP

guest_nov10An educator returns from a summer excursion abroad with a new appreciation of community and culture communicated through food and cuisine.

Over the summer of 2010 I was given a unique opportunity to spend 14 days in England at Oxford University studying the history of European cuisine. First let me say that what took thousands of years to develop could not be researched in 14 days even with the 100 miles of books at the Oxford Bodleian Library. But what I did learn and experience came in the form of the best kind of research, eating and having conversations with chefs, restaurateurs and the people of the countries I visited: Let’s begin my journey…

[See part 1 of Riggs’ story of his journey by clicking here. The story concludes below.]

While in Oxford I was able to gain a solid understanding of English cuisine, its focus on fresh products, light meals, healthier cooking techniques (except for the pastries) and a more relaxed approach to dining as an event—not just something to somehow squeeze into the day. The diversity of ethnic cultures in Oxford and England as a whole has led to a wide selection of international cuisines with a great deal of authenticity in them in comparison to the “Americanized” international cuisines we commonly see in the United States.

Guest Speaker: My Culinary Awakening in Europe

Monday, 01 November 2010 00:00

By Michael Riggs, Ph.D., CEC, FMP

guest_nov10Part 1 of a two-part story of an educator’s learning excursion this past summer.

Over the summer of 2010 I was given a unique opportunity to spend 14 days in England at Oxford University studying the history of European cuisine. First let me say that what took thousands of years to develop could not be researched in 14 days even with the 100 miles of books at the Oxford Bodleian Library. But what I did learn and experience came in the form of the best kind of research, eating and having conversations with chefs, restaurateurs and the people of the countries I visited. Let’s begin my journey …

London
Truly an “international cuisine city” with more than 100 cuisines being served in some of the finest restaurants in Europe. London has gone through a culinary explosion in the past decade, according to Geoff Booth, assistant principal (vice president) of the oldest culinary school in London, which was established by Chef Auguste Escoffier and Hotelier Cesar Ritz, two of Europe’s leading industry icons of the 1900s at Westminster Kings College of Hospitality.