Guest Speakers

Feb 27, 2020, 6:41

Guest Speaker: Strategies for Effective Leadership

Thursday, 15 July 2010 19:53

By Lynn Schwartz

guest_july10As we enter new positions, many of us (including graduates just starting out) will want to hurry to implement our passions and agendas for change. Dr. Linda Schaumann Reese explained at CAFÉ’s recent Leadership Conference why this common approach is NOT a recipe for success.

Businesses spend millions of dollars investing in new leaders, but research shows that many of these enthusiastic, qualified leaders will fail. With the hospitality industry expanding and diversifying, higher levels of education and expectations are required. Chefs need to be more than cooks; they need to be strong, effective leaders. What keeps leaders from succeeding and what can you do differently to avoid failure?

Guest Speaker: What Would Jamie Do?

Wednesday, 02 June 2010 14:19

By John Lawn

guest_june10Jamie Oliver's "Food Revolution" treats a serious subject, but turns it into reality-show spectacle.

On March 21, Americans with an interest in either child nutrition or reality TV (or both) got the chance to view the first installment of “Jamie Oliver's Food Revolution,” a stunt-driven, 21st century moral tale that will run as a series on ABC in coming weeks. If you missed it, here's a handy synopsis:

Guest Speaker: Building a Better Chapter

Tuesday, 04 May 2010 15:34

By William C. Franklin, CMC, AAC

guest_may10Like a bell curve, leadership in new chapters of professional organizations rises, then wanes. Adopting certain structural steps will keep a chapter strong, delivering long-term value to members.

Over the four and a half decades that I have worked in this industry, I've observed one constant: The industry puts greater demands on all of us every day. We are busy people with work and life's general requirements. Most of us no longer have the benefit of volunteering weekly or daily hours to our favorite professional organization.

The life cycle of most American Culinary Federation chapters is somewhat predictable and can be applied against a simple bell curve. The curve could cover 10, 20 or 30 years. The beginning of the bell curve represents the energetic chartering group in their mid-20s and 30s. They work hard to get the chapter established and grow the membership, sometimes into the hundreds. This group seems to be the energy and catalyst that sustains all programs and events while moving the chapter forward.

Guest Speaker: Why Networking Is So Important for Career Growth

Monday, 05 April 2010 22:06

By Laura Vaughn, MCFE

guest_april10Encouraging students to participate in professional organizations can help them excel in their careers.

As president of the Northern Illinois branch of the International Food Service Executives Association (IFSEA) and a culinary educator, I recognize the value of participating in a professional organization. Students and recent graduates, however, can also benefit from belonging to IFSEA, even if their careers in the culinary industry have yet to begin.

Finding jobs in today's market is difficult, and making professional connections is often instrumental to getting one’s foot in the door and advancing in the industry. IFSEA supports students in networking and mentorship, and the more they participate, the greater the benefits to their careers.

My role as a culinary educator is to train students to master the foundations of their craft so they can get a job. But technical skills are only a portion of the tools needed for successful career growth in the hospitality or culinary industry. I'm often asked, “What are some skills that I need to climb the ladder” in order to rise to the top of the field? My reply is this: Mastering the basics of the culinary arts is important, but equally important is making contacts within your chosen field, and learning how to interact professionally with those contacts.

Guest Speaker: Aspiring Gen Y Cooks Dish on Culinary Trends

Saturday, 27 February 2010 19:55

By Sharon Olson

guest_march10A recent survey of Culinology® students in their 20s and early 30s underscores interest in innovative, green and healthy cooking. What does it all mean for tomorrow’s menus?

Soon-to-be culinary professionals identified as part of Generation Y—the menu-makers of tomorrow—are starting to influence dining trends, from the use of molecular gastronomy to the increasing incorporation of artisan, farmstead and locally produced ingredients.