Fifty Minute Classroom

Aug 12, 2020, 20:30

50-Minute Classroom: How to Buy Knives, Part 4

Thursday, 06 January 2011 19:53

By Adam Weiner

Chef Weiner completes his valuable student-handout series on purchasing and properly handling and caring for knives.

The articles for the last three months were written in a handout format for your students on how to buy knives/how knives are made, how to hone and sharpen knives and an introduction on how to use knives. This month’s article, again in a form to give out to your students, is about knife safety and care.

50-Minute Classroom: How to Buy Knives, Part 3

Wednesday, 01 December 2010 00:22

By Adam Weiner

fifty_dec10Chef Weiner continues his advice for students on knife selection and maintenance. This month: properly using knives.

Over the last two months, these articles were written in handout format for your students regarding how to buy knives/how knives are made, and how to hone and sharpen knives. Again, as a handout, this month’s article is about using knives. Next month, the last part of this series, will be on how to care for knives.

 

Using Knives
Here’s the bad news: You can’t learn how to use a knife from reading a handout, any more than you can learn how to drive a car by playing a computer game. With that said, there are a number of good Web sites on the subject, such as www.hertzmann.com, particularly, “The Three Aspects of Knife Skills.”

50-Minute Classroom: How to Buy Knives, Part 2

Sunday, 31 October 2010 10:58

By Adam Weiner

fifty_nov10Chef Weiner continues his advice for students on selecting and maintaining knives. This month: the difference between sharpening and honing and the definition of “true.

Last month’s article was a handout for your students on how to buy knives. This month I am giving you a handout on how to hone and sharpen knives. Next month will be on using knives, and then the fourth article will cover how to care for knives. So, cut out the below and give it to your students as part two of a four-part series on knives:

Many new cooks confuse sharpening knives with honing knives. They are not the same thing. Honing a knife puts the edge back into “true,” while sharpening a knife removes part of the metal and creates a new edge.

If you look under a microscope at a knife, you will see a lot of thin teeth, kind of like one of those cheap plastic combs. Through use and washing, the teeth get pushed out of alignment, out of true. The purpose of the steel is to bring the teeth of the knife back into alignment, back into true. If the end of the teeth becomes dull because of a lot of use or abuse, then aligning it with a steel will not help, and the knife will need to be sharpened instead.

50-Minute Classroom: How to Buy Knives

Saturday, 02 October 2010 01:27

By Adam Weiner

fifty_oct10Part 1 of a two-part series from Chef Weiner on advising your students on selecting and maintaining knives.

All culinary students will ask you, at one time or another, about buying knives. Since we are all busy, I thought I would make your life a bit simpler. Just print out the below and give it to your students.

50-Minute Classroom: Braising

Tuesday, 07 September 2010 00:13

By Adam Weiner

fifty_sept10Says Chef Weiner, using firm-cooked sausage to teach the technique of braising can be accomplished within a short class time and brings the concept home to students.

When you think of braising you think of comfort food. From the wafting of the aroma as it cooks and as the plates are carried to the table to its savory down-home “stick to your ribs” flavor, braising has long been popular with families and customers. Pot roast is perhaps the most famous of all braised dishes. For years, osso buco and coq au vin were the most famous restaurant version of braising. Nowadays short ribs seem to have taken their place.