Gold Medal Classroom

Dec 18, 2017, 14:28

Guest Speaker: Aspiring Gen Y Cooks Dish on Culinary Trends

By Sharon Olson

guest_march10A recent survey of Culinology® students in their 20s and early 30s underscores interest in innovative, green and healthy cooking. What does it all mean for tomorrow’s menus?

Soon-to-be culinary professionals identified as part of Generation Y—the menu-makers of tomorrow—are starting to influence dining trends, from the use of molecular gastronomy to the increasing incorporation of artisan, farmstead and locally produced ingredients.

Mayo’s Clinics: Accountability and Assignments

By Dr. Fred Mayo, CHE, CHT

fredmayoMany students have difficulty meeting deadlines. As faculty members, we carry different responsibilities in helping them learn from these various situations.

Last month, we discussed building community in the classroom and fostering student comfort. This month, we are focusing on the other side of the coin: helping students practice professionalism by meeting assigned deadlines.

Our Professional Obligation
Although we teach a wide range of subjects, we all share a common goal of helping our students become better professionals—often a big shift for them when they are still adjusting to college and juggling the many responsibilities of college life. As faculty members, we need to help them learn in every way possible to behave and think like professionals since we only have them briefly before they join the professional world. In fact, over the last 20 years, culinary educators have been successful in changing the ways that chefs and other hospitality professionals (1) establish good team work, (2) create civil and cooperative work environments, (3) treat women and members of minority groups with respect and (4) discourage sexual and other types of harassment. Today’s commercial kitchens are very different from what they used to be!

McCormick® Unveils 10th Anniversary Flavor Forecast™

food3_march10Milestone report features top 10 flavor pairings and leading trends that will define 2010.

The flavor experts at Hunt Valley, Md.-based McCormick have teamed up with leading chefs, food bloggers and other culinary authorities to identify the top 10 flavor pairings and key trends that are poised to shape the way we eat in the year ahead. The McCormick® Flavor Forecast™ 2010 marks a milestone: It’s the 10th anniversary of prolific flavor reports from the industry leader.

Making Infused Oils with Your Students

By Colin Roche, CEC, CCE

food2_march10Though easy to make, infusing oils adds much to the classroom and curriculum.

Infused oils are a great product to make with your students. It not only introduces them to the various herbs and spices available today, but also teaches them how to infuse the flavor into the neutral medium of oil.

Why is oil a great medium for infusing flavors into? Herbs and spices get their flavors from the essential oils in them. Most of these oils are aromatic compounds that we smell when we eat them, and it is these aromas that create much of the flavor we experience. Also, because these aromatic compounds are oils, they're soluble in oils. Simple, right? Now, with an understanding of the method, you can see that infused oils are theoretically very easy to make.

Brioche and Beyond

By Mitch Stamm, CEPC

food1_march10By hiding the science in the pure joy of handling dough that has baked into pastries, you can increase students’ understanding and awareness of the baking process.

Taking a lesson from parents who hide vegetables in other foods and desserts in order to train their children to appreciate them, instructors can do the same by hiding science in food. Many students find the science of baking dry and dull, yet they thrive when producing pastries. Rather than teaching science, why not teach food?